SPEAKING OUT: Adani Mining CEO Lucas Dow and Rockhampton Region mayor Margaret Strelow address media saying there wa a bright future for coal mining, provided the Queensland Government could let them get on with the job of delivering the Carmichael mine.
SPEAKING OUT: Adani Mining CEO Lucas Dow and Rockhampton Region mayor Margaret Strelow address media saying there wa a bright future for coal mining, provided the Queensland Government could let them get on with the job of delivering the Carmichael mine. Jann Houley

Adani's CEO rebukes Trad's call to re-skill coal miners

BRISTLING from the Deputy Queensland Premier's words, suggesting there was a movement away from thermal coal and miners needed re-skilling, Adani Australia's CEO has hit back.

Speaking in state parliament on Tuesday, Ms Trad used mining giant Glencore's decision cap on coal production as an illustration of the coal industry's changing economy saying, "economics is moving away from thermal coal, communities are moving away from thermal coal, nation states are moving away from thermal coal”.

"What we need to do as a coal exporter is understand that and equip our communities with the best possible chance of re-skilling, and that's why we're focused on other materials.”

CEO Lucas Dow took time out from briefing mayor Margaret Strelow at Rockhampton's council chambers to rebuke Ms Trad over her thermal coal mining comments.

"We gave (council) an update and importantly reaffirm to them that we're not going anywhere, that we're going to see this project through and we look forward to delivering on the jobs for Rockhampton,” Mr Dow said.

"It was concerning to hear the Deputy Premier's comments yesterday, regarding people needing to re-skill. The reality is that thermal coal has a long way to go.

"There's a tremendous opportunity for Queensland to provide energy to the world, as part of that create jobs in Queensland, in particular Rockhampton and Townsville.”

Mr Dow said thermal coal had a bright future in South East Asia, particularly in India and Bangladesh, provided the Queensland Government let them get on with the job of developing the Carmichael Coal Mine.

A Queensland government spokesperson said every member of the government was focussed on making sure Queenslanders have the opportunity for long-term, well-paid employment.

"Queensland has the world's highest metallurgical coal, required for making steel,” the spokesperson said.

"We exported more than $36 billion worth of met coal in the year to December 2018 and that's not about to stop.”

The spokesperson said while they had developed a diverse resources sector in Queensland, they were also backing new industries and the jobs they could create.

"As we see new and emerging industries coming onto line, there will need to be new skills and training for these jobs, they said.

"We're talking about broadening the economy and ensuring that people are equipped to deal with new and emerging technologies.”

Addressing the Carmichael project, the spokesperson said the approvals process would continue without political interference as it had for the other the 3000 resources sector individuals and companies who held environmental authorities.