Councillor Brett Olds' 13-year-old son Tristan Olds and his 16-week-old Jack Russell pup Mya were attacked by a dog at Kewarra Beach. PICTURE: STEWART MCLEAN
Councillor Brett Olds' 13-year-old son Tristan Olds and his 16-week-old Jack Russell pup Mya were attacked by a dog at Kewarra Beach. PICTURE: STEWART MCLEAN

Big dog picks wrong target to attack

THE son of a Cairns regional councillor, who rescued his puppy from being mauled by a vicious dog, has made a plea for pet owners to take more responsibility for their animals.

Tristan Olds, the son of Division 9 Councillor Brett Olds, had taken his six-week-old jack russell Mya for a walk along Kewarra Beach on Thursday afternoon.

Tristan, 13, said they were playing fetch under a tree when a large, black-coloured staffordshire dog came bounding towards them.

"We were just sitting there, and it just happened so fast: Mya was watching another dog, and the black staffie just came charging at her and hit her, and nobody actually noticed anything until the dog had her," he said.

"It was just that fast.

"Immediately I just tried to get my dog away from the vicious dog." Tristan scooped Mya up in his arms, while the staffie continued trying to have a go at the puppy.

"The staffie was insanely relentless," he said.

Brett Olds.
Brett Olds.

"I had to kick it off my dog and then it was trying to jump up and get my dog."

The teenager escaped with a cut lip, scratches to his thighs and belly and a bleeding cheek. Mya suffered multiple lacerations.

Tristan was assisted by a passer-by who walked him home.

The Olds family then took Mya to a vet for emergency treatment.

The attack was reported to Cairns Regional Council's animal control unit.

Tristan, who is still shaken from the ordeal, said the incident could have been easily prevented.

"The staffie's owner should have known his dog, and had it on a leash, if he thought it might attack another dog," he said.

Cr Olds, who is very proud of how his son handled the attack, said pet owners needed to take greater responsibility with their animals, and exercise more control over them.

"They not only risk a large fine for their reckless neglect, but their dog could be destroyed if it inflicts damage to another pet or person," he said.

"Why risk that?"