Photo of South Rockhampton flood taken a 1pm from the RACQ CAPRICORN HELICOPTER RESCUE SERVICE helicopter.
Photo of South Rockhampton flood taken a 1pm from the RACQ CAPRICORN HELICOPTER RESCUE SERVICE helicopter. RACQ CAPRICORN HELICOPTER RESCUE

BOM: We will not tell Rockhampton the flood has peaked

FLOOD experts at the Bureau of Meteorology aren't confident enough to tell Rockhampton residents the flood has peaked.

Floods waters are behaving bizarrely in the Fitzroy River, with the river height reaching 8.8m at 9am this morning before dropping back down again to 8.75m.

It is now back up at 8.8m.

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Zane Keleher using a boat to take his bikes to a race meeting.
Zane Keleher using a boat to take his bikes to a race meeting. Contributed ROK060417azane2

The Bureau said it is likely to fluctuate around the current level, but it did not say if it would reach its forecast of 9m, which would flood many more homes.

"Due to these fluctuations in level, the Bureau will not consider the river level to have peaked at Rockhampton until observations show a consistently falling trend," the warning states.

The Morning Bulletin put a series of questions to the Bureau this afternoon after their predictions of a continued rise conflicted with the account of authorities, who said the flood had peaked.

A Bureau spokeswoman said it would not call the peak yet.

"There is still the chance it may go up slightly," the BoM spokeswoman said.

"The Bureau of Meteorology won't call the flood peak until this figure starts to recede."

Polair vision of Rocky flood: Aerial vision recorded as river rises in Rockhampton.
Polair vision of Rocky flood: Aerial vision recorded as river rises in Rockhampton.

BoM yesterday warned the flood would likely stay at its peak for up to two days, with the chance of unexpected rises in what hydrologists at the Bureau call the phenomenon of a "broad hydrograph".

It means home owners shouldn't be complacent their house is safe until flood waters begin to recede overtime.