Vaccinating the nation: state by state breakdown

V-Day: The first Coast residents to get the jab

Some Sunshine Coast aged care residents will be first in line to receive the COVID-19 jab, ahead of the region's health and quarantine workers.

Aged care and disability centres will begin to have staff and residents vaccinated from Thursday.

From Thursday some aged care centres will begin to have staff and residents vaccinated with The Ormsby at Buderim confirmed as being one of the first in the region to receive the Pfizer vaccine.

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Next week the Queensland Government will establish its vaccination hub at Sunshine Coast University Hospital so health and hotel quarantine workers can receive the jab.

Chief health officer Dr Jeanette Young said the government plans to have every one of the state's 27,000 health and quarantine workers vaccinated over the next month.

The hospital hub will be one of six across the state responsible for vaccinating workers in the first phase of the rollout.

Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young, first Qld vaccination recipient Nurse Zoe Park and Qld Health Minister Yvette D'Ath at Gold Coast University Hospital. Picture Glenn Hampson
Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young, first Qld vaccination recipient Nurse Zoe Park and Qld Health Minister Yvette D'Ath at Gold Coast University Hospital. Picture Glenn Hampson

The Federal Government is responsible vaccinating aged care and disability accommodation workers and residents.

Australian Medical Association Sunshine Coast president Roger Faint urged residents to get vaccinated as soon as they can.

Dr Faint said GPs are required to take part in a four to six hour training session to be allowed to offer the AstraZeneca vaccination.

However dates have not been set for when practices will begin to receive the vaccine.

He said the AstraZeneca vaccination to be handled by GPs can be stored in a refrigerator.

Australian Medical Association Sunshine Coast president Dr Roger Faint.
Australian Medical Association Sunshine Coast president Dr Roger Faint.

"I'm very happy to be involved and give vaccinations … I would be happy to take a week off and just vaccinate if we have to," Dr Faint said.

"Some people feel it has been rushed … but the data has been reviewed and (the Therapeutic Goods Association) have looked at the risks.

"They've decided the risks with vaccine is very small and it's a very safe vaccination."

Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt said the staged approach would ensure those who need the most protection get it first.

When will you receive the jab?

Phase 1a: Quarantine and border workers, frontline health care workers, aged care and disability care staff and residents

Phase 1b: People aged 70 and over, remaining health care workers, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples over 55 years, younger adults with underlying medical condition and critical and high risk workers including defence, police, fire, emergency services and meat processing.

Phase 2a: People aged between 50-69, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples aged 18 - 54, remaining critical and high risk workers.

Phase 2b: Balance of adult population and unvaccinated people from previous phases. 

Phase 3: Under 18 years if recommended.

"The vaccination program will save and protect lives. Both of our vaccines will prevent serious illness. That is our primary goal," Mr Hunt said.

A spokesman for Opal Health Care - which operates Kawana, Caloundra and Nambour Care Communities - said they welcomed the opportunity to have residents vaccinated.

"We know that older Australians are more vulnerable to the effects of COVID-19 and protecting our residents and our team who care for them is our first priority," they said.

The rollout will begin with the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, and following the approval by the Therapeutic Goods Administration on Tuesday, will include the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine from early March.