The Rod North and Sons Transport Depot at 2 Jellicoe St, Port Curtis, was sold to Rockhampton Regional Council in 2019 for the South Rockhampton Flood Levee project.
The Rod North and Sons Transport Depot at 2 Jellicoe St, Port Curtis, was sold to Rockhampton Regional Council in 2019 for the South Rockhampton Flood Levee project.

Council snaps up properties to make way for flood levee

GOVERNMENTS need to make strategic property purchases as part of responsible planning to cater for future growth while allowing for the supply of essential services.

Such is the case for Rockhampton Regional Council and its land acquisitions in 2019.

The Morning Bulletin has obtained the list of properties bought for the year, many of which are to allow for the planned construction of the South Rockhampton Flood Levee.

One of the major purchases made was the former Rod North and Sons bus transport site as 2 Jellicoe Street, Port Curtis for $660,000.

It was advised that on one of the properties purchased there was an old house which would be demolished or sold for removal.

Rockhampton Regional Council CEO Evan Pardon said the value paid for these properties was based on ­independent market valuation reports, with provisions taken into account according to the Acquisition of Land Act 1967.

“With the exception of properties purchased for the South Rockhampton Flood Levee the land purchased in 2019 was in line with previous years,” he said.

Two other properties were bought in previous years for the flood levee.

These include 179 Port Curtis Rd, Port Curtis and 117 Wharf St, Depot Hill.

Council has confirmed no more properties need to purchased for the flood levee.

It was noted council did not have a specific annual budget for property acquisitions.

Projects which require property acquisitions have a budget allocation for this.

Mayor Margaret Strelow announced last month she could no longer be involved with discussions or decision making on the project due to changes in the Local Government Act which would result in her having a conflict of interest.

Planning approval for the project was granted by the state government in November 2019. The project is now seeking the remaining ­funding. It was revealed last July the project could cost between $49 million to $109 million.