PLANNING SCHEME: Livingstone Shire Council draft planning scheme shows a section near Glenlee(in pink) is listed as an emerging urban area. This has caused some concern for Rockhampton Regional Council.
PLANNING SCHEME: Livingstone Shire Council draft planning scheme shows a section near Glenlee(in pink) is listed as an emerging urban area. This has caused some concern for Rockhampton Regional Council. Contributed

CQ councils clash over land zoning plans

ROCKHAMPTON Region and Livingstone Shire councils have clashed over the future of land north of the city in the Glenlee area.

Rockhampton council raised objections yesterday to proposed changes to Livingstone's draft planning scheme, which sets the shire's intention for the next 10 to 15 years of growth.

But Livingstone Councillor Graham Scott said the zoning in question won't stop Rockhampton from moving north in the future.

In a formal submission, Rockhampton council is expected to raise issues with the projected zoning of the largely undeveloped rural land beyond the region's northern boundary which it says could affect the city's future expansion.

Rockhampton Mayor Margaret Strelow said this area would be the centre of future growth.

"Livingstone Shire are proposing to allow large parcels of land just over the border to be subdivided into a park residential acreage,” Cr Strelow said. "This creates two problems for us. The first is that extra people will be living in this part of Livingstone Shire and putting pressure on Rockhampton Regional Council's roads and services but not contributing to the costs of the services.

"But the second and probably more worrying is that when land has been chopped up into this size block it becomes very hard for proper residential subdivision to happen later.”

Cr Scott said the contentious area was far enough away from the boundary to allow growth and was a logical addition to the shire, being wedged between two rural residential zones (Glendale and Rockyview).

He said the "emerging community” zoning recognised it was more likely to be utilised for some type of urban development in the future, be it housing, a school or commercial, than for rural activities.

The area immediately over the boundary will remain zoned rural residential and will not be subdivided.

"That recognises there is an emerging potential urban use in an area,” Cr Scott said.

But he said it was likely to be at least a decade before Rockhampton would need to consider moving over the boundary, with about 4000 lots in the northern part of the area needed to be used before that outcome.

With that time-frame coinciding with the projection for the next planning scheme, Cr Scott said it was likely Livingstone would then change the zoning along the boundary to allow for urban development.

"The planning departments of both councils have talked at length about how the two plans worked together and we're well aware of this in the longer term being the growth corridor of Rockhampton,” he said.

"We've ensured there is no impediment in this draft planning scheme for that to occur in the future.”

Cr Scott said it was unfair to use the argument that Livingstone ratepayers used Rockhampton services, with many people working at businesses which also paid significant rates to council.

"The people that are travelling on Rockhampton council roads, the great majority of them are not then visiting council assets,” he said. "They're there for particular purposes and many of those purposes support Rockhampton businesses and the properties on which those business are accommodated on pay rates.”