Australian Army Corporal Jaik Weston operating a chainsaw to clear and remove debris at the Kershaw Botanic Gardens as part of the Engineer Support Group. *** Local Caption *** Teams of chainsaw operators from the Australian Army s Engineer Support Group (ESG) are continuing to make major inroads as part of the clean up effort in the wake of Cyclone Marcia. On 3d March 2015, a section of troops from the 3rd Combat Engineer Regiment (3 CER) descended on Rockhampton s Kershaw Gardens, to clear access paths and remove a significant number of fallen trees. The ESG has surged to almost 200 soldiers so it can further assist State Emergency Service personnel, local contractors and members of the community restore Rockhampton, Yeppoon and Byfield regions.
Australian Army Corporal Jaik Weston operating a chainsaw to clear and remove debris at the Kershaw Botanic Gardens as part of the Engineer Support Group. *** Local Caption *** Teams of chainsaw operators from the Australian Army s Engineer Support Group (ESG) are continuing to make major inroads as part of the clean up effort in the wake of Cyclone Marcia. On 3d March 2015, a section of troops from the 3rd Combat Engineer Regiment (3 CER) descended on Rockhampton s Kershaw Gardens, to clear access paths and remove a significant number of fallen trees. The ESG has surged to almost 200 soldiers so it can further assist State Emergency Service personnel, local contractors and members of the community restore Rockhampton, Yeppoon and Byfield regions. SGT Mick Davis

Out of the debris of Marcia flames stimulation for jobs

FROM the ashes of major disasters rise the flames of economic stimulation and Capricornia has already begun to feel the momentum.

Skilled workers are arriving in the area and for the first time in a long time, many of the region's long-term unemployed are seeing opportunities that didn't previously exist.

Cheryl Russell (pictured) from Employment Services Queensland said the organisation was building a data base to match employers with workers.

"A lot of industries will benefit out of this… there's an economic stimulus from disasters and not just in the building industry," she said.

"A lot of money is going to be spent locally and people will need to run their businesses in different ways to what they have.

"On Friday last week, we helped three new employers to the area fill 20 positions."

A partnership between ESQ, Back on Track Indigenous Training and Employment and an outside indigenous service has already placed 40 workers, without previous experience, in Ergon's call centre and administration.

"These positions are typically for six weeks to three months," Ms Russell said. "But quite often they extend out to six months and then a number are kept on in permanent jobs."

ESQ is also working closely with Livingstone Shire Council, teaming volunteers to work in parks and gardens, construction and maintenance.

"The council is looking to keep the good ones on as staff members," Ms Russell said.

In many cases, ESQ is able to provide safety tickets, protective equipment, white cards and end-to-end recruitment at no cost.

"We're building a data base of eligible staff, some skilled, some just willing to learn and help," she said.

"This is a very good opportunity for less-skilled workers to find employment."

In demand now

Tree loppers

Truck drivers

Labourers

Asbestos workers

Call centre operators

Call ESQ 4922 5400