TIME FOR QUIET: John Partridge is fed up with his neighbour's noisy music from the speakers pictured below.
TIME FOR QUIET: John Partridge is fed up with his neighbour's noisy music from the speakers pictured below. Maddelin Mccosker

Fighting for his right to stop the party

EVERY day, Depot Hill resident John Partridge is on edge waiting for the next time his home shakes and his body trembles.

Set up in the backyard of his neighbour's house, just 20m from where he lays his head at night, are two speakers akin to those seen at concert events.

Despite living in a small suburban area, his neighbours regularly blast the music, which Mr Partridge said leaves him feeling physically ill.

"If it was Slim Dusty I wouldn't be complaining,” he said.

"I can hear their music from the next street down.

"It's in my house, I can hear it over the radio.

"I'm not just a grumpy old man having a whinge. I want to get this conversation going because this is not an isolated case, it's throughout our broader community.”

Mr Partridge said he has yelled at his neighbours to turn it down and even reported it to police, however the music is always turned off when officers arrive or it's only a temporary fix.

"There's not a jot of consideration. These speakers have no place in a residential area, they belong at a rock concert,” he said.

The speakers that are keeping John Partridge awake at night.
The speakers that are keeping John Partridge awake at night. Contributed

"These particular people who own that sound equipment sit around outside and have little soirees and parties and blast that rotten music.

"It's not the volume so much as the low level base.

"It affects my respiration and my heart beat.”

Mr Partridge is appealing to the Queensland Minister and Commissioner for Police to introduce a law where similar sound systems are seized after first complaints.

"On the reporting of a first validated and reasonable complaint, the attending officers are authorised and bound to seize and take with no recompense, possession of the equipment and destine it for destruction,” he said.

He also added that repeat offenders should receive "additional punitive measures”.

"I believe there is no place or excuse for such brazen disregard of the general community, albeit, private or commercial in nature,” he said.

"There should be no refuge allowed in considerations of rights or concessions make to the ilk of antisocial individuals or entities.

"There can be no defence.

"News flash: the sanctity of my home is no less worthy of consideration.”

However, Mr Partridge said special occasions like 21st birthday events or weddings are permissible for loud noise.

"Good neighbours slip around and let neighbours know if they're going to be putting on a bit of a do,” he said.

"That's once in a blue moon.

"But when you're waiting for the shoe to drop, for the next time the music happens, which can be any time, you exist in a state of suspense.

"It can be exhausting at times and doesn't engender good will between offenders and innocent neighbours.”