Jenny Wayman from the Salvation Army is starting a new program to help people with addictions. Photo: Chris Ison / The Morning Bulletin
Jenny Wayman from the Salvation Army is starting a new program to help people with addictions. Photo: Chris Ison / The Morning Bulletin Chris Ison

Hey Rockhampton, it’s fine to go dry for July

ALMOST one in three (30%) of younger Aussies (aged 18-24) believe it is now more socially acceptable to drink a lot.

The alarming finding comes from a report commissioned by the Dry July initative which also found more than a third (35%) of Aussie drinkers have been concerned at some stage in their life that they drink too much.

They have also felt embarrassed (37%) and/or guilty (36%) about their bad behaviour while drunk. Almost one in five of Aussie drinkers have lied about their drinking habits to friends and/or family.

Over a third (36%) of Aussie drinkers would like to reduce their drinking.

The findings come as the Salvation Army's Jenny Wayman introduces a program to help Rockhampton folk who are struggling with alcoholism and drug addiction.

"I have felt for a long time that it's something that needs to be done," Jenny said.

"We want a program that happens every week, and we are going include families.

"Recovery is a big part of it but there are a lot of implications on families and supporters of those people to how they can support them."

Brett Macdonald, Dry July chief executive officer, was positive.

"Our research report has found that Australians are increasingly aware of their own health and are looking to make positive changes to their habits," he said.

Dry July

There is still one month left to register for Dry July 2016.

To sign up visit www.dryjuly.com/signup

or donate at www.dryjuly.com/donate.

First Step Program

What: A step by step journey of education, intervention and recovery for people with addiction and their family and friends

When: 5.30pm Tuesday nights

Where: The Salvation Army, 131 Park St North Rockhampton