Rockhampton Art Gallery's Messy Mondays program has been the place to go for children under five and their parents, offering a friendly place to play and learn.
Rockhampton Art Gallery's Messy Mondays program has been the place to go for children under five and their parents, offering a friendly place to play and learn.

Kids get messy as popular art program moves online

KIDS from across Central Queensland have the chance to get those creative juices flowing and make a mess with a popular art program moving online.

Rockhampton Art Gallery's Messy Mondays program has been the place to go for children under five and their parents, offering a friendly place to play and learn.

Hosted by artist educator Ainslie McMahon, children are presented with activities designed to enrich their creativity and awareness of the visual world around them while also helping to develop fine motor skills. There is also a song and a story to accompany each activity.

 

Artist educator Ainslie McMahon has been running Messy Mondays sessions at Rockhampton Art Gallery since 2017.
Artist educator Ainslie McMahon has been running Messy Mondays sessions at Rockhampton Art Gallery since 2017.

 

Ms McMahon, who has been running Messy Mondays sessions at the gallery since 2017, said her role was "very rewarding".

"It is not only incredibly satisfying, encouraging others to enjoy the art experience and have pride in their creation, but reinforces my understanding of the power of creativity to change lives in a positive way," she said.

"Art nourishes a more inclusive community, and breaks down barriers through this commonality, which is something I witness constantly.

"It is an honour to guide others in being creative and learning new skills."

Due to COVID-19, Rockhampton Art Gallery had to rethink how to deliver the program, and the solution was to take it direct to people's homes via the internet.

Rockhampton Regional Council Community Services spokesperson councillor Drew Wickerson said the gallery's Messy Mondays program was a valuable asset to the community.

"At Messy Mondays children are exposed to creative thinking and problem solving, and research shows that this style of play better equips our younger generation into the future," Cr Wickerson said.

"One of the benefits of making Messy Mondays available online is that parents can take part at a time that suits them and their children. That could be something as simple as fitting in with a child's nap time or perhaps enabling a child to take part with a visiting grandparent."

Messy Mondays Online is free and presented in a video format through Rockhampton Art Gallery's website at www.rockhamptonartgallery.com.au/Learn/Messy-Mondays-Online.

The first instructional video, Make A Purple Monster, is available now.