The Sunshine Coast University Hospital has become just one source of the growth in available medical and medical support jobs on the Sunshine Coast.
The Sunshine Coast University Hospital has become just one source of the growth in available medical and medical support jobs on the Sunshine Coast.

1600 JOBS: Vacancies surge for skilled Coast workers

SUNSHINE Coast job seekers will find work aplenty particularly if they have the skills needed to compete in three specific areas.

A new report released today has identified to the end of August more than 13,000 jobs across regional Queensland.

Of those 1634 were on the Sunshine Coast.

The Regional Australia Institute said one in three regional job vacancies across the country could be found in Queensland.

It said vacancies would continue to grow in regional areas, but population projections showed Brisbane would treble in size by 2056 while regional areas only doubled.

The institute's co-chief executive officer, Liz Ritchie, said across the six areas in regional Queensland, there were more than 3200 professional jobs on offer.

The roles included doctors, nurses, finance workers, human resource managers, engineers, educational professionals, sales and marketing managers, and media representatives.

On the Sunshine Coast there were 396 professional vacancies for carers and aides, medical practitioners, and general inquiry clerks.

Another 260 vacancies existed for technicians and trades employees and 247 for community and personal service workers.

Ms Ritchie said population, jobs and regional migration would be the key issues discussed in Brisbane today at Regions Rising QLD, which was the fifth stop in the institute's national roadshow that would take in every capital city.

"Regional Australia has many job opportunities, and we know many communities are working locally to come up with solutions to fill these roles," she said.

Regional Australia Institute modelling has also found regional workers identified in its latest report, Regional Population Growth: Are We Ready?, would also see higher average wages than their outer suburban Brisbane counterparts - if Queensland's population distribution was altered.

"Our report tests the economic consequences relating to incomes if we change the national population trajectory we are on and moved to a higher regional growth scenario," Ms Ritchie said.

"This means pulling policy levers to encourage people to take up work opportunities in regional Queensland.

"By 2056, outer Brisbane is expected to triple in size to nearly 3 million people. However, regional centres will only double, yet job vacancy rates in regional areas are outstripping our capital cities."