Recent graduate Torey is excited to begin his career at the Capricorn Correctional Centre.
Recent graduate Torey is excited to begin his career at the Capricorn Correctional Centre.

QCS graduates lead the charge

ONE OF Queensland Correctional Centre’s latest graduates, Torey, was “super excited” to begin his role at Capricorn Correctional Centre - a role that he expects will keep him on his toes. Torey was one of 10 custodial officers who completed 10 weeks of training, and were welcomed into the industry on Thursday by QCS leaders, loved ones and Member for Keppel Brittany Lauga.

“Definitely (excited to) jump into a role that is very diverse, that keeps you on your toes and has opportunity for growth, to move up the ladder and keep myself busy studying,” he said.

Torey said he was confident in the training the group received, that had prepared them to now go into a final week of practical work at the centre before starting work on December 23.

Member for Keppel Brittany Lauga with Queensland Correctional Centre's latest graduates. Back L-R: Jerome, Darren, Ryan, Travis, Ashley and Matteaus. Front L-R: Laura, Jeffrey, Torey and Ryan.
Member for Keppel Brittany Lauga with Queensland Correctional Centre's latest graduates. Back L-R: Jerome, Darren, Ryan, Travis, Ashley and Matteaus. Front L-R: Laura, Jeffrey, Torey and Ryan.

“There’s a lot of variety in what we covered. The first couple of weeks were heavy on book work - legisalition, law... but also control and restraint techniques and firearms close to the 10th week.

“It’s enjoyable to work in a team environment.

“(For the final week), we’ll rotate around the centre, and make sure have good grasp on how everything happens in the centre as well,” he said.

Torey said the support of loved ones had been pivotal and would continue to help the graduates throughout their careers.

“You need that support network on the outside because it’s a demanding job and you’re doing shift work,” he said.

Assistant Commissioner of Women and Safer Custody Command Tamara Bambrick.
Assistant Commissioner of Women and Safer Custody Command Tamara Bambrick.

Ms Lauga said two of the graduates had plans to become training instructors themselves, furthering the education of future officers.

“These officers have been through 364 hours of training in the lead up to graduation and it’s just another step forward for them and for the Correctional Centre in terms of boosting the front line staff that we have at that centre,” she said.

“These officers help keep our community safe by keeping those prisoners within the grounds as much as possible, and they also play a role in helping the prisoners to rehabilitate and to stop them from having to come back to prison.

“Through mentorship, their guidance, perhaps a little bit of counselling, those sorts of things can go a long way for people who have found themselves in prison officers will play a really important role in that rehabilitation process.”

Assistant Commissioner of Women and Safer Custody Command Tamara Bambrick, who has spent 23 years at QCS, said the centre was currently recruting.staff from admin to correctional officers. She said having respectful relationships, which underpin their work, was an important part of QCS.

“This is a job that can have its ups and its downs, and not to be down with the down but to see that opportunity every single day.”