Front page of the Rockhampton Morning Bulletin August 20, 1999, when Peter Scott Griffin pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting four women. He was later sentenced in 2000 to 13 years jail.
Front page of the Rockhampton Morning Bulletin August 20, 1999, when Peter Scott Griffin pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting four women. He was later sentenced in 2000 to 13 years jail.

Rapist back on street despite being caught filming teen

A RAPIST who has repeatedly broken supervision rules while out of jail has been caught taking covert pictures of a 15-year-old girl getting changed in a Rockhampton clothes store.

Peter Scott Griffin, 50, served a 13-year sentence after pleading guilty to attacking three women in the street in 1998, forcing them to perform oral sex on him and raping one.

Griffin's latest breach occurred on May 11, 2018.

He had approval to attend the Stockland shopping centre in North Rockhampton in the company of his sister or niece but went there alone.

The 15-year-old girl - dubbed Miss A - was shopping in the City Beach store when she noticed a man looking at her.

The teenager entered a changing room and undressed to her underwear to try on some clothes when she noticed a mobile telephone under the door in camera mode.

She dressed herself and then went back into the main area of the shop where she saw the man who she had seen previously looking at her.

City Beach has extended their vouchers to have a three year expiry.
City Beach has extended their vouchers to have a three year expiry. Contributed

READ: Throw away the key: A rapist's sordid past

Miss A left the store and called her mother.

She then returned to the store and spoke to a staff member and shop security before reporting the matter to police.

Another young woman was working at City Beach on the same day when she noticed a man staring at her in a way that made her feel uncomfortable.

The presence of Griffin in the store at the shopping centre unaccompanied constituted a breach of condition of his supervision order.

Later investigations also revealed that Griffin had been communicating via the internet with women in Russia.

Part of that communication involved him getting naked photographs they sent to him.

Griffin was not allowed to access a computer and use the internet in that way.

In a newly-published judgment, Justice Peter Davis made additional requirements against Griffin after finding he had contravened requirements of his supervision order.

Griffin is now banned from owning or frequently using more than one mobile telephone.

He must also allow any device to be randomly examined.

READ: 'I wanted to humiliate my victims in the most awful way'

Griffin also needs to supply details of any email address, chat rooms or social networking sites he uses, including user names and passwords.

He must also disclose the name of each person with whom he associates.

Justice Davis said Griffin resisted claims he pushed his mobile telephone under the door of the change room.

"It is not necessary for the applicant to prove this allegation in order to prove the contravention..." he said.

"It is sufficient to prove that the respondent (Griffin) was at the shopping centre without either his niece or sister.

"Miss A and Miss B have both sworn affidavits.

"As the evidence is not contested, I can see no reason to dismiss it.

"The respondent (Griffin) was identified in closed-circuit television security footage taken outside the City Beach store.

"I find that the respondent did push his mobile telephone under the door of the change room while the telephone was in camera mode and thereby attempted to take images of Miss A while she was addressed."

Griffin was identified in CCTV footage taken outside the City Beach store.

Justice Davis said the central question was whether the adequate protection of the community - despite the contravention or likely contravention of the existing order - could be ensured by a supervision order.

"The respondent has previously been on supervision and has been unable to comply with the terms of the supervision order," Judge Davis said.

"That has resulted in him being in custody for much of the time during which the supervision order has been in force.

"The respondent, while in the community, has not committed a serious sexual offence.

"The conduct towards Miss A was no doubt very upsetting for her and unacceptable.

"While Miss A was a child, the psychiatrists both opined that her youth was not a factor in the respondent's behaviour.

"He shows no tendency to offend against children."

Judge Davis said the evidence of the psychiatrists is to the effect that the supervision order is fulfilling its purpose in protecting the community against unacceptable risk of the commission of serious sexual offences by the respondent.

"It is clear, though, that the respondent's activity should be more carefully monitored.

"The additional conditions that I have imposed achieve this," he said.

Both psychiatrists agreed that a loosening of a condition prohibiting Griffin from drinking alcohol was appropriate.

One psychiatrist, Dr Harden, formed the view that Griffin met the diagnostic criteria for the paraphilia of Sexual Sadism with Personality Disorder Not Otherwise Specified with Anti-Social Borderline and Narcissistic Features.

Dr Harden noted that no violent sexual offence had been committed by Griffin while on supervision.

The front page of The Morning Bulletin in August 1999 after serial rapist Peter Scott Griffin pleaded guilty to a series of violent attacks in Rockhampton. He was sentenced to 13 years jail in February 2000.
The front page of The Morning Bulletin in August 1999 after serial rapist Peter Scott Griffin pleaded guilty to a series of violent attacks in Rockhampton. He was sentenced to 13 years jail in February 2000. File

Breaches of order

While in the community, Griffin became involved in an altercation with police and was returned to custody in October 2013.

He was again released in November 2013 and placed back on a supervision order in May 2014.

He was jailed again in July 2014 after he lost his temper with his supervisors because they put him on a 24-hour curfew when an online romance soured.

The July 2014 incident was his third breach in less than two years.

He was released again into the community on the supervision order on January 27, 2015.

In May 2016, Griffin was again taken into custody pursuant to a S20 warrant.

The proceedings were discontinued and he was released on November 30, 2016.

Griffin was taken into custody on the present alleged breaches on May 14, 2018.

The psychiatric evidence on Griffin

DR Sundin prepared a report dated September 16, 2018 after her interview with Griffin on July 23, 2018 at the Capricornia Correctional Centre.

Dr Sundin had previously provided reports in 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2014 for earlier proceedings.

Dr Sundin noted her previous opinion that the respondent had a history suggestive of a Mixed Personality Disorder with Borderline Anti-Social Personality Traits.

In her latest report, she opined that the "supervision order is serving the purpose of containing the risk that Mr Griffin potentially poses to the community" and recommended that he be released again under the supervision order.

 

PRISON DRAMA: Controversy brewing in Capricornia Correctional Centre.
The Capricornia Correctional Centre. Contributed

On the question of alcohol, Dr Sundin said this: "Given his history of decades of abstinence from alcohol and the conflict that it is (sic) created in his interactions with QCS staff over consumption of alcohol, I suggest that consideration could be given to deleting this clause from the supervision order."

In a supplementary report of October 16, 2018, Dr Sundin said this: "Since I supplied my original report on this man dated September 21, 2018, I have been reflecting further on the alcohol abstinence clause of his supervision order. My advice recommending complete removal of this clause may be premature.

"It is 25 years since Mr Griffin says he has consumed alcohol and he asserts that he is not interested in resuming consumption of alcohol.

"Rather than being an all or nothing approach, I would prefer if QCS introduce a gradual easing of the abstinence requirement in discussion with Mr Griffin.

"This could be a gesture of goodwill and an opportunity to practically demonstrate to Mr Griffin the benefits of more open disclosure with his case manager and psychologist."

Another psychiatrist, Dr Harden, formed the view that Griffin met the diagnostic criteria for the paraphilia of Sexual Sadism with Personality Disorder Not Otherwise Specified with Anti-Social Borderline and Narcissistic Features.

Dr Harden noted that no violent sexual offence had been committed by Griffin while on supervision.