Fitzroy River barrage on February 4, 2020 with the gates open as the storage level reached 100 per cent capacity at 3.30am that morning.
Fitzroy River barrage on February 4, 2020 with the gates open as the storage level reached 100 per cent capacity at 3.30am that morning.

Rocky marks five years without drinking water incident

ROCKHAMPTON Regional Council water and sewerage unit, Fitzroy River Water (FRW), has been reportedly operating to a “very high standard” for the past year.

An annual performance plan for until June 30 2020 was presented to the Rockhampton Regional Council table this week.

The overview notes while there were five noncompliances marked against the 22 customer service standards, in most instances these couldn’t be achieved due to COVID-19 measures.

It is noted FRW continues to maintain a “very high standard” with water quality in both water and sewerage operations.

The progress of the capital program delivery has been significantly impacted by COVID-19 implications.

Billed water consumption is in excess of 9.3 per cent compared to same period last year.

Bulk water sales were above target, influenced by high water consumption at The Caves and Rockhampton-Yeppoon pipeline water supply schemes.

Expenditure for the quarter was $2m, 38 per cent less compared to the same period last year.

This is attributed to the delay of large contract capital projects.

The areas of prominent activity are the North Rockhampton Sewerage Treatment Plant augmentation design, Jardine Park and Hadgraft Street SPS renewals, Gracemere water main extensions, barrage gate height increase, sewer refurbishments and water main replacement programs.

Drinking water quality across the region has remained at a “very high standard”.

It has now been almost five years since a drinking water quality incident was recorded.

Raw water quality in the Fitzroy River Barrage has reportedly remained “relatively constant since the river flows in early 2020 with little sign of an early start to the development of cyanobacteria”.

Drinking water quality complaints have remained at relatively low levels.

The barrage storage level rose to 100 per cent however ongoing lack of significant rainfall in the Mount Morgan area resulted in the steady decline of the No. 7 Dam.

Level four water restriction were implemented and it is hoped rain will fall in spring and early summer.

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