Ashmar Barbour is one of a number of CQ students who have received an RSL Youth Development Program grant, which Ashmar is using to pursue his interest in physics.
Ashmar Barbour is one of a number of CQ students who have received an RSL Youth Development Program grant, which Ashmar is using to pursue his interest in physics. Chris Ison

Student heads to Canberra to learn from physics professors

SHADOWING professors and students in the field of science and physics at Australian National University, Ashmar Barbour is reaching for the stars when it comes to deciding his career.  

After missing out on a spot to the National Youth Science Forum next week, the Rockhampton Grammar School student took it upon himself to contact ANU's Professor John Close from the Quantum Science Physics Education Centre to get an insight into the field.   

"I'm going to go down for about four days to a week and just shadow some students, graduates and lecturers," he said.   

"Just to have a look at how they work or what they're working on, I'm really looking forward to it, and it'll be a really good experience."  

The 16-year-old is just one of a number of CQ students who received the Christmas bonus from the RSL (Queensland Branch) Youth Development Program.  

The program, operated in conjunction with Bond University, recognises and rewards the efforts of high-achieving students.  

Ashmar said he regularly reads mind-bending science magazines and was fascinated by the endless possibilities that science and physics offer.   

"I was originally interested in quantum physics but then I got interested in biotechnology, and things like extracting DNA," he said.   

"It baffles me how people don't find this stuff interesting, things like the stars, it's overwhelming."  

Also a keen soccer and water polo player, the intelligent Emu Park teen is also taking on a science subject at CQU over his school holiday break.