Students at the climate change protest held at Yeppoon.
Students at the climate change protest held at Yeppoon.

WATCH: Cap Coast students demand climate action in protest

EDUCATING residents of Central Queensland on the impacts of climate change has long been a cause close to the hearts of Jordyn Groves and Sean Murphy.

The duo - both in Year 12 at Yeppoon State High School - were among some of the many brains behind Friday morning's peaceful protest held near Yeppoon Lagoon.

With the coastline an appropriate backdrop, the pair stood front and centre leading a small climate strike rally in response to the Morrison Government's apparent mishandling of the crisis.

Nationwide events were also held as youngsters fight to have both their concerns and voices heard surrounding the issue.

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Sean Murphy and Jordyn Groves at the peaceful protest held at Yeppoon.
Sean Murphy and Jordyn Groves at the peaceful protest held at Yeppoon.

Unfortunately, due to COVID-19 restrictions, only a small number of people were permitted to attend Capricornia's event.

Ms Groves said what she hoped to come from today's Global Day of Action event would be a much-needed focus on a sustainable future and use of renewable energy.

"We want our Government to be able to fund clean jobs and clean energy," she said.

"To support the young people growing up who have so much anxiety and pressure on them about what our world and our climate is doing and how we are affecting that as a human race."

 

Climate change activists at Yeppoon park, Friday 25 September. : Capricornia residents have gathered at Yeppoon's beachfront to protest against climate change.
Climate change activists at Yeppoon park, Friday 25 September. : Capricornia residents have gathered at Yeppoon's beachfront to protest against climate change.

 

Mr Murphy added the future looked grim for younger generations due to the government's "slack response".

"It's quite scary. We're going to be alive when they're dead and we're going to have to fix this mess," he said.

"Right now, as we live and breathe, this is the worst our world has ever been, but it's not the worst it will ever be. Things are going to continue to get worse."

The 18 year old also took particular issue with the $54 million spent on gas fracking, saying the funds could have instead been used to develop the renewable energy sector.

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Students at the climate change protest held at Yeppoon.
Students at the climate change protest held at Yeppoon.

The concerns come around nine months after the region - and most of Australia - suffered through a horrific bushfire season.

She knows of many young people who share the same concerns, though admits speaking out against older generations could sometimes prove intimidating.

"They really think about and try to reduce their litter and do everything they can as an individual for the community, but they're scared to speak up and have people who are older shut them down," Ms Groves said.

"It's scary to think that we are going to be the ones left here, and they're not listening to our concerns, of what we feel like is a significant issue in our society."

 

Climate change activists show their support for the cause.
Climate change activists show their support for the cause.

The inspiring duo previously teamed up to host last year's climate strike march, along with being frequent contributors to online petitions.

"It was good that we came [today] and stood up and represented, but next time it will be great to be able to have more people and a bit more preparation," Mr Murphy said.

For now, they hope to see climate education start to be shared in primary schools to help develop awareness of the devastating global crisis.

"We can't do anything without people starting this conversation, without people also saying you need to stop giving money to the gas industry," Ms Groves said.