PELICAN WATERS: Waterfront property owners with a pontoon or jetty are just months away from having access to the Pelican Waters canals and the Pumicestone Passage as construction on the $5.5 million southern lock system nears completion. Photo: Terry Landsberg Facebook page
PELICAN WATERS: Waterfront property owners with a pontoon or jetty are just months away from having access to the Pelican Waters canals and the Pumicestone Passage as construction on the $5.5 million southern lock system nears completion. Photo: Terry Landsberg Facebook page

Waterfront properties to benefit from $5.5m lock and weir

Waterfront property owners with a pontoon or jetty are months away from having access to the Pelican Waters’ canals and the Pumicestone Passage as construction on the $5.5 million southern lock system nears completion.

Designed by Covey Engineers and built by Hall Contracting, the navigational boat lock is a structure designed to allow a canal to cross land that is not level.

This makes the waterway more easily navigable by raising and lowering water craft between the stretches of water on different levels.

In this case, Pelican Waters developer project manager Phil Tyler said it would allow boats up to 15m long to traverse between the existing tidal canals and the Pelican Waters southern lake, which has static water level.

Waterfront property owners with a pontoon or jetty are just months away from having access to the Pelican Waters canals and the Pumicestone Passage as construction on the $5.5 million southern lock system nears completion.
Waterfront property owners with a pontoon or jetty are just months away from having access to the Pelican Waters canals and the Pumicestone Passage as construction on the $5.5 million southern lock system nears completion.

“As a boat enters the lock, a remote control unit is used to close gates behind the boat,” Mr Tyler said.

“The difference in water level between the tidal canal and lake system is picked up by sensors allowing the water level within the lock to be adjusted to match the level of the lake or canal depending on the direction the boat is heading.

“When water levels in the lock match levels outside of the lock, a second set of gates open allowing the boat to continue its way.

“The whole process takes just few minutes.”

Local fishing expert Rob Paxevanos said it would make it safer for boaties and benefit local marine life.

“Developers are progressively getting better at working with nature,” he said.

“(The lock creates) like a shared waterway between people and fish (and) gives the fish a great refuge of deep water to grow, live and breed.”

Divisional councillor Terry Landsberg said about 720 cubic metres of concrete and 150 tonnes of reinforced steel was used within the main lock shell.

This work coincides with the second $4.5 million bridge being built linking Michael St to the emerging new residential island in Pelican Waters.

“Construction of such a large structure immediately adjacent to an existing canal is logistically challenging because the base of the structure is several metres below sea level and fine tolerances must be achieved to ensure the gates operate smoothly,” Mr Tyler said.

When it is complete, the lock will service about 200 waterfront properties allowing property owners with boats to access the Pelican Waters canals and the Pumicestone Passage.

It is the second structure of its type to be built at Pelican Waters estate.

The first lock and weir was built about 15 years ago in the northern section.

The bridge will allow another access point from the east to Pelican Waters’ new emerging The Island precinct.