BIG FLOOD: The burials of members of the Williams family who fell victim to the vicious 1928 flood which ripped through the Mt Morgan and Dawson Valley areas. Mr Larry Muldoon (who is also paid tribute at this particular site at Walmul) along with Mr Alfred Williams Snr is buried at the Mount Morgan Cemetery.
BIG FLOOD: The burials of members of the Williams family who fell victim to the vicious 1928 flood which ripped through the Mt Morgan and Dawson Valley areas. Mr Larry Muldoon (who is also paid tribute at this particular site at Walmul) along with Mr Alfred Williams Snr is buried at the Mount Morgan Cemetery. James Lindley

Will there be new memorial to pay tribute to flood victims?

IT WAS an event which went down in history as one of the town's worst natural disasters.

Now members of the Mount Morgan community have raised their voices as to whether they want a restoration, modernisation or no improvement to memorials which commemorate the lives lost in a fatal 1928 flood.

These recent calls for a restoration to sites at Walmul, a short drive south of the historic town's CBD, have been heard ahead of the flood's 91st anniversary next month.

The Morning Bulletin conducted a poll earlier this week which showed a strong support towards a restoration, if not a modernisation.

However, the push for a modernisation was met with some disapproval.

Forty people voted for a modernisation, 10 disapproved, while 68 others wanted to repair and protect the memorials due to their historic nature.

One particular site, which can be found via Hempseed Rd, pays tribute to six members of the Williams family and Lawrence (Larry) Muldoon and is nestled in a small clearing with several concrete squares which serve as headstones.

Another memorial was established for Mr Alfred Tull who also lost his life during the disastrous event.

And a third memorial came out of the woodwork (to our knowledge) recently after The Morning Bulletin contacted Rockhampton Regional Council for information on the land.

A RRC spokeswoman revealed there was another memorial on private land, which belonged to the Hempseed family.

This particular site honoured the Mulligan family, which consisted of two adults and two children who drowned during the big flood.

See below comments from various members of the Mount Morgan Pride Facebook site who lent their views to the push and their connections to the tragic event and the Walmul area.

Judith Masters: I lived at Walmul in a house right on the main road with my family but have never heard much history of the place.

Although when we went to Walmul in 1960 there was a very old house alongside the house we moved into - but my father later demolished it.

We were told the property we had - Kia Ora station was the remnants of a much larger place that had been divided up.

Katrina Anderson: There is already an existing memorial built there for my Great Grandfather; Alfred Vivian Tull who was known in the area as being a strong swimmer and athlete.

Marlene Smith: My grandfather, Alfred Tull drowned in that flood and is buried on the side of the road. Near Mt Piebald. The grave site is still there.

Gary Molloy: It seems that a new generation is showing an interest in the tragedy of the 1928 flood at Mt Morgan - and this is good as we should remember our tragedies as well as our successes.

Gina Richards: I have seen the grave site, most definitely worth repairing and protecting. Why not? All grave sites are sacred.

Lynette Dunstan: It should at least be tidied up and a pool type fence erected around it with a plaque explaining the reason for the deaths.

James Lindley wrote on a separate Mount Morgan Pride Facebook post "this story is part of Mount Morgan's history so if you possibly can, save your history”.

"Well done to the person that suggested improving the site,” Mr Lindley said.

A brief history of the flood:

After flood waters rushed through the Dee River at Mount Morgan from Struck Oil, it swept up everything in its path and farmers lost their livestock as raging torrents rose to 40 feet.

Larry Muldoon's property at the junction of Fletcher's Creek was washed away while the Williams family were employed to pick cotton on the farm.

The Williams family who lost their lives were Alfred Godfrey Erasmus Williams (senior), Alfred John Charles Williams (junior), Ellen Elizabeth Williams (nee Nelson), Elsie Mary Williams, Dorothy Kathleen Williams and Henry Alfred Williams (whose body was never recovered).

It was reported on April 23, 1928 neither fences nor trees on the farm remained once the water ripped through the area, and the only signs left of the house were a few blocks.